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From Page to Stage: Perspectives on Theatricality in Historical, Philosophical, and Literary Discourses

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MARCH 15-16, 2013 | SARRATT STUDENT CENTER 216/220

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Hosted by the German Graduate Student Association in collaboration with the Departments of Philosophy, English, and Spanish & Portuguese

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Dr. Ulrike Haß (Department of Theatre Studies at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany)

The genre of drama stands at the intersection between literature and theory, text and performance, page and stage. Due to the complex constellation in which the genre is involved, this interdisciplinary, intercultural conference seeks to explore multiple perspectives on dramatic works.

What happens when a work is spoken and performed that does not when it is only read, and what does the process of bringing a work to the stage entail? Questions of historical context and interpretation play a crucial role in leading up to the performance of a drama. This process can and does lead to diverse adaptations of the same work, and becomes itself a distinct means of challenging modes of representation. How did Georg Büchner’s fragment “Woyzeck,” for instance, become a theatrical piece – and one that is so often staged musically? What played a role in Alban Berg’s choice of atonal music?

Beyond the dramaturgical path of work to stage, the genre of drama, its purpose, and its performance have been informed by theory and philosophy at different times. Theatre, in turn, has a history of influencing aesthetics. Some plays perform and incorporate philosophical concepts, whereas others postulate concepts of their own by calling for a specific performance practice. Historicity is not the only factor involved in such exchanges; (un)timeliness plays a large role for works which could only have been written in their time, but were created in an era that was not ready to receive them. Why have some works been staged and acclaimed only in a later era? Why and how are some works so relevant as to continue to be performed today?

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 2013

2:00 p.m.
Registration

2:15 p.m.
Opening Remarks
Mike Hiegemann (Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, Vanderbilt University)

2:30 p.m.
Panel 1: Mediums in Flux
Moderator: Clara J. Fisher (Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, Vanderbilt University)

“Production Value: Reproducibility in Theatre and Film”
Ellen Anderson (Philosophy Department, Emory University)

“Karoline Schulze-Kummerfeld’s Autobiographical Performance”
Claudia Mastriana (Department of Germanic Studies, University of Maryland College Park)

“The Postmodern Space of the Internet/World in René Pollesch’s Heidi Hoh arbeitet hier nicht mehr
Jamie Zelechowski (Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, University of California)

4:00 p.m.
Coffee Break

4:30 p.m.
Panel 2: Myth-Making
Moderator: Anne Margaret Castro (English Department, Vanderbilt University)

“How Uncle Tom’s Cabin Changed the World, and Vice Versa”
Victoria Abrash (Theater Program, Eugene Lang College)

“Consequences of Adaptation: From Don Quijote to Man of La Mancha
Adrianne Woods (Department of Language, Literatures, and Cultures, University of South Carolina)

5:30 p.m.
Coffee Break

6:00 p.m.
Reading: Cardenio
Leah Lowe (Department of Theatre, Vanderbilt University)

7:00 p.m.
Welcome Dinner

SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013

9.00 a.m.
Breakfast

10:00 a.m.
Panel 3: Mises en scène
Moderator: Ambika Athreya (Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, Vanderbilt University)

“Staging Violence: The Tragic Mimesis and the Question of Effective Plot-Building”
Arata Takeda (Department of Germanic Studies, University of Chicago)

“Questions of Stage and Representation in Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus
Meike Hinnenberg (Department of Theatre Studies, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany)

11:00 a.m.
Coffee Break

11:30 a.m.
Keynote Lecture
“The Theatre’s Two Bodies: Protagonist and Chorus”
Prof. Dr. Ulrike Haß (Department of Theatre Studies, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany)

1:00 p.m.
Lunch Break

2:00 p.m.
Panel 4: Politics of Representation
Moderator: Lisa Beesley (Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, Vanderbilt University)

“Matters of the Law: Staging Kafka’s The Trial in 1945”
Yevgenya Strakovsky (Department of Languages, Cultures, and Literatures, Stanford University)

“Deutsche Demokratische Räuber: Staging the Turning Page of History”
Amy Stebbins (Department of Germanic Studies, University of Chicago)

“(Post-)Migration on Stage in Jens Hillje’s and Nurkan Erpulat’s Crazy Blood
Viktoria Gabriel (Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, University of California)

3:30 p.m.
Coffee Break

4:00 p.m.
Panel 5: Resistance
Moderator: Darla Migan (Department of Philosophy, Vanderbilt University)

“Where Is the Tomorrow That We Saw Yesterday? On Heiner Müller’s Concept of History”
Ibrahim Marazka (Philosophy and Literature Program, Purdue University)

“Beckett’s Active Spectator”
Deleah Silva (Department of Drama, Tufts University)

“The Problems of Perspective and Relationship: Examining the Stage Adaptations of William Faulkner’s Novel As I Lay Dying
Michael Rau (Department of Music and Performing Arts, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development)

5:30 p.m.
Closing Remarks

5:30 p.m.
Closing Reception
At the home of Prof. Meike Werner. Directions will be announced.